Rebecca Donegan and María Coronel

María Coronel and Rebecca Donegan helping to improve the odds against disease with assist Beckman Coulter Foundation and Dasher Endowment

Rebecca Donegan will use the grant to find out more about nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), a pathogen that causes lung infections

New Engineering Faculty Members, All Hailing from Georgia Tech ECE. Top row (l-r): Maad Alowaifeer, Bahar Asgari, Ningyuan Cao, Zackory Erickson, and Yan Fang. Bottom row (l-r): Min-gu Kim, Jingfei Liu, Oluwaseun Sangodoyin, Wonbo Shim, and Jong-Hyeok Yoon.

Ten recently minted Georgia Tech ECE Ph.D. graduates and postdoctoral fellows/associates have been hired into faculty positions around the world, despite a difficult and challenging job market.

Bacteria behind acute periodontitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans most often lives peacefully in the mouth until circumstances lead it to become infectious. It forms flower-like colonies, here under a microscope sporting a colorful stain added by a researcher. Aa is gram-negative. Credit: Derren Ready (2012) CIL:38942, CIL. Dataset. https://doi.org/doi:10.7295/W9CIL38942 Creative Commons license

Mythbuster: Ideas that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes are generous and exclusive appear to be quite wrong.

More methane is released than carbon dioxide; microbial diversity declines.

Georgia Tech undergraduate student Lillian Chen demonstrates how she and colleague Alex Hubbard studied snakes as they moved through an arena covered with shag carpet to mimic sand. (Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech)

A new study shows how the motion of snakes moving across a sandy surface can be affected by obstacles.

A clownfish peers out of an anemone in a tank at Georgia Aquarium. Anemones usually sting, kill and eat fish, but not clownfish. Georgia Tech researchers found that the microbial colonies in the slime covering clownfish shifted markedly when the nested in an anemone. Could the microbes be putting out chemical messengers that pacify the fish killer? Credit: Georgia Tech / Ben Brumfield

Why the fish-killing anemone spares the clownfish is a scientific mystery that Georgia Tech marine microbiologists are now tackling in fish mucus.

In a vile three watery solutions phase separate into three layers. In membraneless organelles, chemical reactions occur at the interfaces of such layers, processing a reactant step-by-step and moving the reaction product from one layer to the next. Credit: Georgia Tech / Rob Felt

Just tiny puddles. That's what some of our cells' organelles are, and this synthetic organelle, engineered in the lab, shows how they can work.

CMOS multi-modal cellular interface array chip in operation in a standard biology lab.

Nano-electric technology may improve the drug development process.

Georgia Aquarium life support experts (like Matthew Regensburger, left) wanted to know which bacteria were removing nitrates from the water of Ocean Voyager, the largest indoor oceanic aquarium in the US. Georgia Tech marine biochemists (Andrew Burns, center, and Zoe Pratte, right) discovered very natural bacterial colonies at work.

How natural can the seawater in a large inland aquarium be? New study at Georgia Aquarium gives scientists a good sign

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