New Engineering Faculty Members, All Hailing from Georgia Tech ECE. Top row (l-r): Maad Alowaifeer, Bahar Asgari, Ningyuan Cao, Zackory Erickson, and Yan Fang. Bottom row (l-r): Min-gu Kim, Jingfei Liu, Oluwaseun Sangodoyin, Wonbo Shim, and Jong-Hyeok Yoon.

Ten recently minted Georgia Tech ECE Ph.D. graduates and postdoctoral fellows/associates have been hired into faculty positions around the world, despite a difficult and challenging job market.

Georgia Tech undergraduate student Lillian Chen demonstrates how she and colleague Alex Hubbard studied snakes as they moved through an arena covered with shag carpet to mimic sand. (Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech)

A new study shows how the motion of snakes moving across a sandy surface can be affected by obstacles.

A clownfish peers out of an anemone in a tank at Georgia Aquarium. Anemones usually sting, kill and eat fish, but not clownfish. Georgia Tech researchers found that the microbial colonies in the slime covering clownfish shifted markedly when the nested in an anemone. Could the microbes be putting out chemical messengers that pacify the fish killer? Credit: Georgia Tech / Ben Brumfield

Why the fish-killing anemone spares the clownfish is a scientific mystery that Georgia Tech marine microbiologists are now tackling in fish mucus.

In a vile three watery solutions phase separate into three layers. In membraneless organelles, chemical reactions occur at the interfaces of such layers, processing a reactant step-by-step and moving the reaction product from one layer to the next. Credit: Georgia Tech / Rob Felt

Just tiny puddles. That's what some of our cells' organelles are, and this synthetic organelle, engineered in the lab, shows how they can work.

CMOS multi-modal cellular interface array chip in operation in a standard biology lab.

Nano-electric technology may improve the drug development process.

A special breed of cichlid fish has allowed researchers to match up gene activation with behavior. The up and down-regulation of genes may actually be steering ritual mating behaviors. The research is potentially useful in understanding autism since some genes involved in the fish behavior have human genetic cousins implicated in autism spectrum disorder. Credit: Georgia Tech / Rob Felt

Instinctive behavior may be directly driven be gene regulation, at least researchers were able to match the two up.

An artist's rendering of cancer cells clustering among healthy cells. Credit: iStock via rights purchase / not a press handout / not for redistribution outside Georgia Tech

Generic cancer cell illustrations available at iStock/Getty Images.

Tiny cancer signals of the glycoprotein sort evade detection, but they'll have a hard time dodging the new "chemical octopus."

Image shows a rendered confocal laser scanning micrograph of a mixed species bacterial biofilm observed in a chronic wound model of infection. Staphylococcus aureus (yellow) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (purple), organize themselves in small, dense clusters of cells called aggregates. (Credit: Sophie Darch, Whiteley Lab and Rumbaugh Lab at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.)

Study shows how bacteria behave differently in humans versus the lab.

To understand their strategies for working effectively without clogging traffic jams, researchers studied how fire ants dug tunnels in glass particles that simulated soil. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

A new study shows that ants have a lot to teach robots about working in confined spaces.

Corallivorous gastropod (Coralliophila violacea) feeding on a Porites cylindrica coral. (Credit: Cody Clements, Georgia Tech)

A previously overlooked predator could be increasing the pressure on endangered coral reefs.

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