New Engineering Faculty Members, All Hailing from Georgia Tech ECE. Top row (l-r): Maad Alowaifeer, Bahar Asgari, Ningyuan Cao, Zackory Erickson, and Yan Fang. Bottom row (l-r): Min-gu Kim, Jingfei Liu, Oluwaseun Sangodoyin, Wonbo Shim, and Jong-Hyeok Yoon.

Ten recently minted Georgia Tech ECE Ph.D. graduates and postdoctoral fellows/associates have been hired into faculty positions around the world, despite a difficult and challenging job market.

The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant in central Wyoming. Credit: Wikimedia Commons CC 2.0 Generic Goebel

This is what could happen if all endangered regulations that help in the fight against harmful ozone go away.

Greater diversity of coral species on reefs can help corals survive and thrive.

More methane is released than carbon dioxide; microbial diversity declines.

A clownfish peers out of an anemone in a tank at Georgia Aquarium. Anemones usually sting, kill and eat fish, but not clownfish. Georgia Tech researchers found that the microbial colonies in the slime covering clownfish shifted markedly when the nested in an anemone. Could the microbes be putting out chemical messengers that pacify the fish killer? Credit: Georgia Tech / Ben Brumfield

Why the fish-killing anemone spares the clownfish is a scientific mystery that Georgia Tech marine microbiologists are now tackling in fish mucus.

This could actually become a practical, marketable energy solution. Practical to run at cooler temperatures and on cheap fuel: the new fuel cell in the lab of Meilin Liu at Georgia Tech. Credit: Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore

Cheap fuel, cool temperatures, low material costs: This fuel cell could spread to homes and cars.

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